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Tiffany Yeung Wins Prize at Shean Strings Competition

Tiffany Yeung Wins Prize at Shean Strings Competition

Published on May 24, 2019

Tiffany Yeung
Sixteen-year-old violinist Tiffany Yeung has won the second prize at the 2019 Shean Strings Competition, which took place in Edmonton, Alberta on May 17 and 18. Tiffany received a $5,000 prize in recognition of her achievement.

Tiffany is a scholarship student of The Phil and Eli Taylor Performance Academy for Young Artists, The Royal Conservatory of Music’s celebrated training program for classical musicians aged 8–18. Beyond her success at Shean, Tiffany has won the 2017 “Remember Enescu” International Violin Competition in Romania, as well as the 2017 Vancouver International Music Competition. 

Tiffany’s teacher, acclaimed violinist Dr. Conrad Chow, is proud to see how her dedication to music study has translated into continued success internationally. 

“Her commitment and drive was evident even when she was seven years old,” Dr. Chow recalls. “As a student, Tiffany takes even the most minute suggestions and points of interest I mention throughout our lessons, and always comes back having integrated the ideas into her playing. As a teacher, that is an absolute joy to experience!”

Tiffany is one of a several students and alumni of The Taylor Academy to have achieved success in recent weeks. Mezzo-soprano and alumna Ema Nikolovska became the first Canadian named to BBC’s New Generation Artists Scheme. The prestigious program selects leading young classical and jazz musicians around the world and provides them with an extensive series of performance and promotional opportunities across the United Kingdom. 

Fellow alumnus Blake Pouliot earned rave reviews in the United States in his debut performances with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra from May 16–19, 2019. His performance of the Brahms violin concerto under conductor Pablo Heras-Casado received wonderful notices in the Dallas Morning News. Music critic Scott Cantrell praised Blake’s distinctively passionate interpretation of the piece, and declared “both soloist and conductor made magic.”

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